Stories by Robert L. Mitchell

4 things to do now to get ready for the Internet of Things

As CIO at Boeing, Ted Colbert is no stranger to the Internet of Things. For more than a decade, the aerospace giant has deployed thousands of communications-enabled smart devices to sense, control and exchange data across the factory floor, on the battlefield, and within the company's 787 Dreamliner aircraft.

The paranoid's survival guide, part 1: How to protect your personal data

Who says privacy is dead? While it's true that marketers, the government, data aggregators and others are gathering and analyzing more data than ever about every individual, you can still exert some control over what's out there, who's tracking you and what they do with that information.

Ad blockers: A solution or a problem?

Ad blockers can make websites cleaner and faster for users, but they can also take a nasty bite out of advertising revenue. How popular are they, and what can site publishers do about them?

Gotcha! FBI launches new biometric systems to nail criminals

Nearly 80 years after it began collecting fingerprints on index cards as a way to identify criminals, the Federal Bureau of Investigation is moving to a new system that improves the accuracy and performance of its existing setup while adding more biometrics.

Why green IT is good for business

IT is uniquely positioned to drive green IT projects by identifying opportunities for operational efficiency -- and helping to build the business case.

12 predictive analytics screw-ups

Whether you're new to predictive analytics or have a few projects under your belt, it's all too easy to make gaffes. "The vast majority of analytic projects are riddled with mistakes," says John Elder, CEO at data mining firm Elder Research.

NBC Universal: Retired or recycled 47 tons of hardware

NBC Universal had no room to expand its West Coast data center, located on the Universal City lot in Los Angeles. So Dan Johnson, senior vice president of platform technology, and his team recycled it. The data center refurbishing project, which CIO Christopher Furst refers to as "converting a brownfield," virtualized 60% of the physical servers and shut down 2,000 physical machines.

Big businesses take a small bite of the Apple

On the surface, USAA looks like a prime example of how Apple is making new inroads into large enterprises. The financial services company has deployed more than 500 iPhones and 300 iPads, has about 200 Macintosh computers, and it's considering bringing in more Macs to displace some of its Windows desktops.

Grocer goes with thin clients

Ian Cawson faced a hard deadline: Have a PC strategy in place for the Manchester, England-based retailer's 14 corporate offices, and have it ready when the new head office, a green building, opens in 2012. There wasn't time to conduct a full discovery process and gather all of the business requirements. "Best practices in this instance went out the window because of the time scales, and we knew it had to be done without business impact," he says.

Display tech to watch this year: E-paper stretches its wings

No. 3 on our list of display tech to watch this year is e-paper, the technology behind most of today's popular e-book readers. <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9137163/Apple_Update">Apple</a>'s April 2010 launch of the <a href="http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9149338/Continuing_coverage_Apple_s_iPad_tablet">iPad</a> media tablet and its runaway success gave e-reader manufacturers a scare. But while the market has bifurcated, the pie has gotten bigger and both markets continue to grow.

Display tech to watch this year: Haptics create a buzz

If multitouch display technology is proliferating, haptic feedback is helping to fuel the trend. Haptics provide tactile feedback to your fingers as you touch a display by vibrating all or part of the display surface.

Display tech to watch this year: Multitouch catches fire

Touch-screen panels have been around for more than a decade, but it was the 2007 introduction of a multitouch screen in Apple's iPhone that galvanized the market. Now the business is going gangbusters -- as are the innovations that touch-screen manufacturers hope will build on Apple's success.

Market Place

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