Spammer wants $15 per name on stolen database

The former Ihug customer who used a stolen Ihug password file as an email database has now said that customers on the list will have to pay him $15 each for information he is required to provide under the Privacy Act.

The former Ihug customer who used a stolen Ihug password file as an email database has now said that customers on the list will have to pay him $15 each for information he is required to provide under the Privacy Act.

Andrew Hooper told Ihug customer David Farrar, who demanded to know what information was stored against his name and email address, that he was unable to send the information over the Internet because he could not verify the identity of the recipient. Hooper said there would be "a charge of $15 for this service as the paperwork has to be processed and posted via surface mail".

Farrar, a communications consultant with Parliament's Ministerial Services, says the request for money is outrageous. "I have discussed this with the office of the privacy commissioner and their opinion is that there is no justification at all for such a fee."

"You can't make money out of complying with the act and you can't even necessarily put a fixed charge on supplying the information," says Farrar.

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