Hyper-G returns to NZ as HyperWave

HyperWave, the grown-up version of Hyper-G, a product developed from beta at Auckland University that automatically rebuilds and updates links between Web documents, is being used at the Museum of New Zealand to allow curators and visitors to access multimedia information.

HyperWave, the grown-up version of Hyper-G, a product developed from beta at Auckland University that automatically rebuilds and updates links between Web documents, is being used at the Museum of New Zealand to allow curators and visitors to access multimedia information.

Depending whether you log on as a visitor or staff at MONZ you will see the same pictures but different information.

The National Library is also using the system - for online access to the Heritage Turnbull Library.

HyperWave inventor Professor Her-mann Maurer, who spent time as an honorary professor in Auckland and set up the Auckland University’s computer science department’s hypermedia unit, has returned to Austria - where Hyper-G was invented - to sell HyperWave commercially.

The hypermedia unit is continuing to develop and train in HyperWave.

“A Web server with hundreds of documents can mean chaos,” says Maurer.

“It can take five manual operations to insert something new. Links in an ordinary Web server are unidirectional. You may have links pointing to your site but you don’t know who they are. If you remove a document you break those links.

“HyperWave is bidirectional and links are managed in a separate database so you can inform linked sites that a link is broken and also deactivate links.”

HyperWave incorporates its own object oriented database for storing both meta- information and documents. These can store attributes for documents.

Maurer gives the example of “calender of events” type applications such as a joke of the day on a magazine

or newspaper.

“Normally someone would have to put up a new joke every day but with HyperWave you can put 350 jokes in the database and it will automatically update each day. The system makes out of date documents invisible and deactivates all links.”

Overseas HyperWave users include Motorola in the United States, Sumitomo in Japan and Novell in Germany.

Maurer says that German Airo-Space replaced 50 software Web servers with three Hyper-Wave servers.

Auckland-based Kaon Technology will distribute the software — is available from March — and will be aimed at the corporate intranet market.

Kaon directory Tony Krzyzewski says local pricing is not available yet but HyperWave will probably cost more than a traditional Web server but less than a relational database.

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