RealAudio vendor offers radio with pictures

Progressive Networks Inc. is planning to set the standard for streaming video over the Internet with a technology called RealVideo, launched this week. The company hopes RealVideo will be as successful as its RealAudio technology, which in two years has become the de facto standard for running audio on the Net.

Progressive Networks Inc. is planning to set the standard for streaming video over the Internet with a technology called RealVideo, launched this week. The company hopes RealVideo will be as successful as its RealAudio technology, which in two years has become the de facto standard for running audio on the 'net.

RealVideo sends video over the Internet or intranets in incremental streams via a video-capture card for live video or the Apple QuickTime and AVI formats for stored video. It is for applications including Web-based videos and broadcast news, and video over corporate intranets, saysPhillip Rosedale, general manager of Progressive's applications group.

RealVideo has RealPlayer client and server software and can operate on connections as slow as 28.8K bits per second, because a buffer stores incoming video so it can be played back at faster speeds. The server can send as many as 500 video streams at a time, and multiple servers can be clustered. When RealVideo ships in April, versions for Windows 95, the Macintosh PowerPC, and Unix will be available. The server software will range in price from US$295 to $4,995, and the client software is free.

Progressive Networks Inc., in Seattle, can be reached at http://www.prognet.com.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments
[]