Trimble scores coup with ANZAC frigate software

Software developed by Trimble New Zealand for speed trialling of ships has been modified for the ANZAC frigates project. The contract is worth $US120 million.

Software developed by Trimble New Zealand for speed trialling of ships has been modified for the ANZAC frigates project.

The contract is worth $US120 million.

Trimble spokesman Gary Chisholm says the software was first developed when the International Maritime Organisation (IMO) issued new standards for ship trialling.

Conventional trials using buoys or land-based markers have become outdated, as have some of the other methods, such as using notepads, whistles and stopwatches.

Trimble’s Ship Trial System uses the latest in differential GPS technology to provide precise position and vessel guidance information. It links with other integrated data to produce complete graphical reports of the ship trial tests, based on the IMO’s draft interim standard for ship maneuverability.

Till the ANZAC contract, Chisholm says, the software was mainly sold into Korea, which is a major ship builder.

A customised version of the Ship Trial System is being used as part of the trialling process for the 10 new ANZAC Class frigates. The contract was awarded by Transfield Defence Systems, the prime contractor in the ANZAC Ship Project.

The system features full integration with existing equipment, including a customised dual-shaft monitoring system and engines.

This increased functionality allows the system to provide further performance data, including clutch position, torque, RPM, thrust and power.

Each ANZAC ship constructed by Transfield is undergoing a series of trials conducted under a number of conditions in Bass Strait and Port Philip Bay.

Trimble holds more US patents on GPS and related technology than any other organisation.

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