Nokia puts phone on a card

Nokia is continuing its marriage of cellphone and computer with its cellular card phone, a PC card with a built-in GSM phone that cuts out the need for interface adapters, cables and cellular phones when getting online from a portable computer.

Nokia is continuing its marriage of cellphone and computer with its cellular card phone, a PC card with a built-in GSM phone that cuts out the need for interface adapters, cables and cellular phones when getting online from a portable computer.

Weighing 60g, the card works like a GSM phone.

It fits into the PCMCIA slot in a laptop to let users send and receive faxes and email, use the Internet and download contact files from company databases.

The card can also lets a PC that is equipped with speakers and microphone make voice calls.

It has a Windows 95 interface and is compatible with a range of email programs including MS Mail, cc:mail and Teamware mail. It transmits data at speeds of up to 9600Kbit/s and allows V.42bis data compression.

The card will be available in the fourth quarter of 1997 and is expected to cost $799 ex GST.

James Campbell, wireless data manager for Nokia Asia-Pacific, says Nokia sees the card phone as appealing to business people who regularly communicate by email and fax and to those who need to send and receive information in the field.

The card could also be installed in vending machines to send information about supplies.

“In the data market, research has found 3% to 5% of cellular subscribers are already using their phones to send email or faxes. By the year 2000 that is expected to rise to 15-75% of subscribers. By the year 2000 more than 50% of cellular traffic is predicted to be non-voice trafffic,” says Campbell.

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