Clear CEO Makin opts for the quiet life

Clear Communications' chief executive Andrew Makin has resigned in pursuit of a quieter life. Makin, who will stay in New Zealand, says he is leaving Clear for a change in lifestyle. When a successor has been appointed he will take a short break and then 'look at making contributions at the boardroom level' in New Zealand - but not in the telecommunications industry.

Clear Communications' chief executive Andrew Makin has resigned in pursuit of a quieter life.

Clear chairman John Ede announced the resignation yesterday. Makin, who will stay in New Zealand, says he is leaving Clear for a change in lifestyle. He made the decision with his wife about six weeks ago.

“The reasons I am going are entirely personal. I have been a CEO for nearly half my working life and I want to do some other things with my life. Having just turned 55, I have seen many people in their 50s get sick or even drop dead. The time has come to take time out. However, I will stay with Clear until the board has found a successor.”

Makin says he will take a short break and then consider taking up work in a different role.

“I will look at making contributions at the board level but not for Clear. I don’t think it is a good idea to have a former CEO move to the board.”

He also doubts that he will go back to the telecommunications industry.

Ede says the company expects the search for a new CEO to take from three to six months. He says the company will consider an internal appointment or alternatively taking on someone from Clear shareholders British Telecom or MCI.

Ede says Makin, who joined Clear as CEO in October 1993, was instrumental in taking the company from the structuring phase to the marketing phase. Under Makin’s leadership the company has become profitable (earning more than $100 million in pre-tax profit), doubled in value, expanded its services and market share (more than 20% for basic tolls) and doubled its staff.

Makin told the Board of his decision in April but held off making a formal announcement until the company had launched its future vision to staff this week.

He says his one regret on resigning is that he was not able to convince IT Minister Maurice Williamson of the need for government intervention in the New Zealand telecommunications industry.

“We still face a monopoly. The coalition government says it will take ‘necessary action’ but we have been hearing that since 1990.”

Born in England, Makin originally came to New Zealand in 1990 to run Airways Corporation. Prior to this he was president and chief executive of the British Columbia Automobile Association from 1982. He has also worked for McCann Erickson Advertising and British European Airways which later merged with BOAC to become British Airways.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Market Place

[]