Oracle object tools plan: a work in progress

Although Oracle's Sedona object development and repository technology will likely see the light of day, its ultimate form is still undetermined. That's the word in the wake of chairman Larry Ellison's pronouncement this month that was Sedona unfit for release. Ellison cast doubt on its future, but officials maintain that the project is under review rather than terminally wounded.

Although Oracle's Sedona object development and repository technology will likely see the light of day, its ultimate form is still undetermined.

That's the word in the wake of chairman Larry Ellison's pronouncement this month that was Sedona unfit for release. Ellison cast doubt on its future, but officials maintain that the project is under review rather than terminally wounded.

The primary change to the Sedona project involves swapping the architecture's current Basic language engine for a Java one, says Dennis Moore, vice president of product marketing in Oracle's tools division.

Sedona's latest feature set includes an object request broker (ORB)-like Object Manager for integrating multiple object models; a federated repository for development in a networked environment; a development front end; and programming and modeling tools. Sedona's Live Object Model will let developers add business rules to existing components and Oracle8 objects, Moore says.

The Object Manager will eventually leverage ORB technology licensed from Visigenic Software, says Beatriz Infante, Oracle's senior vice president of Internet and media products.

One user questions Oracle tools' emphasis on objects.

"The demand for objects is still not really here yet. Informix proved that," says Jeffrey Jacobs, president of Jeffrey Jacobs and Associates, in Belmont, California, and head of the Oracle Development Tools User Group. "[For now] there's more need for Windows and NCA [Network Computing Architecture] support."

The critical issue is "not whether Sedona is released, but what comes after Developer2000," Infante says.

The forms-based Developer2000 is unsuited to object-oriented development, Infante says, adding that Oracle's plans regarding Sedona are in flux.

Oracle says the Sedona development environment and repository, after receiving a Java infusion, will become a reality in 1998 and next month will detail its revised plans.

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