PIPS payroll system heads for retirement

It's the end of an era for the payroll system which once served around 90,000 government employees. The Personnel Information and Payroll Service (PIPS) system was once the mainstay of government departments but was terminated as of June 30 because it was no longer meeting modern human resources demands.

It’s the end of an era for the payroll system which once served around 90,000 government employees.

The Personnel Information and Payroll Service (PIPS) system was once the mainstay of government departments but was terminated as of June 30 because it was no longer meeting modern human resources demands.

It began life as the Centralised Payroll Service, and came under the umbrella of the State Services Commission.

It then became Payroll Personnel Records (PPR) in the late 1960s, before becoming PIPS, which at its peak serviced more than 50 customers or 90,000 employees.

In the late 1980s there was some drift toward in-house services and by the time EDS outsourced the management of PIPS to New Zealand Payroll in October last year, there were about 20 departments (with around 25,000 employees) left running the system.

By June 30 this year, there were just two. One was the New Zealand Police which has just announced a move to Peoplesoft’s human resources management system and payroll applications for its 8500 staff. It has an implementation deadline of April 1 next year.

New Zealand Bureau managing director Martin Gleeson declined to name the other department but did say that department would be finishing with PIPS in August. Gleeson says PIPS was very stable, but hadn’t moved forward with modern human resources needs.

He says a number of the clients who have moved off PIPS have migrated to AMS’ Leader payroll and human resources package.

New Zealand Police spokesman Bruce Wilkinson says the police had decided to get new software regardless of the demise of PIPS.

He says the main benefit of the new PeopleSoft system is that the human resources and payroll systems will be integrated.

“That’s going to allow us to better comply with the sort of reporting requirements that we have to other government-type organisations, in particular treasury.

Wilkinson believes the new software will enable the police to produce their own reports more quickly and without additional help. He says that will save time and result in cost savings.

Peoplesoft say the solution will give the police the capability to look at the human resources and payroll processes as a whole, and draw out specific information on certain activities.

It says it will give them the ability to better research, administer, monitor and report on human resource and payroll issues, both within the organisation and when reporting to government.

Condol International has been selected as the police’s PeopleSoft implementation partner. The Condol team will combine forces with eight police IT staff assigned to the PeopleSoft project, which has an implementation deadline of April 1 1998. Police human resources personnel will join the implementation team at various stages throughout the project to work through business processes.

PeopleSoft Australia and New Zealand managing director Murray Creighton says the contract to supply the New Zealand Police was a strategic win for the company, because police organisations rely more than most on mission-critical systems.

“The selection of PeopleSoft, chosen after stringent selection procedures, is confirmation of our software’s performance, functionality and reliability.”

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