Intel officially opens for business in NZ

Intel officially launched its New Zealand sales and marketing office yesterday - with the kind of funky hoopla which has come to characterise the chip giant's US marketing. Dancers in fabrication plant-style suits and hoods (inexplicably referred to within the corporation as 'bunny people') opened the press launch with dance modelled on Intel's current US TV ad, which uses the Bee Gees' 'Stayin' Alive'. It's all part of Intel's global emphasis on communications, video and multimedia.

Intel officially launched its New Zealand sales and marketing office yesterday - with the kind of funky hoopla which has come to characterise the chip giant's US marketing.

Dancers in fabrication plant-style suits and hoods (inexplicably referred to within the corporation as "bunny people") opened the press launch with dance modelled on Intel's current US TV ad, which uses the Bee Gees' 'Stayin' Alive'. (A similar ad, using Wild Cherry's 'Play That Funky Music White Boy', was a little controversial, given that real fab-plant workers are almost all Mexican or Asian.)

Although the primary role of the new office will initially be to support locally-based PC manufacturers through the G.I.D. (Genuine Intel Dealer) scheme, we can expect to see print and TV advertising and promotions based around the 'Intel Inside' brand.

In the US, the company has signalled the importance of the consumer and entertainment markets, and it has sponsored events such as the New York Music Festival in order to profile the Visual Connected PC - Intel's vision of the Internet-connected multimedia-equipped personal computer.

The company will also be launching networking products and videoconferencing products based on its ProShare technology. Country manager Scott Gilmour says it will be "emphasising communications, video and multimedia. Things like digital cameras, which I think are going to be the next killer app in the consumer market."

Gilmour is a native of Invercargill who worked for Burroughs and NCR before joining Intel in 1989. He has returned to take up the job after 15 years in the US. Before his new appointment he was closely involved in Intel's drive to establish ProShare with developers.

Additional information on Intel's New Zealand presence can be had at:

http://www.intel.com/nz/eng

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Market Place

[]