Sun prepares to unveil Java hardware spec for OEMs

In a few weeks, Java Internet Business Expo (JIBE) in New York will play host to a raft of Java-related introductions, including a Java specification from Sun Microsystems for OEMs,which is dubbed the JavaEngine 1. This board-level reference platform is intended to optimise hardware for the JavaOS and provide a consistent stage for Java applications. Also at the show, Sun is expected to offer a road map for products from recently acquired information-appliance maker Diba that will be aimed at the consumer market.

In a few weeks, Java Internet Business Expo (JIBE) in New York will play host to a raft of Java-related introductions, including a Java specification from Sun Microsystems for OEMs,which is dubbed the JavaEngine 1.

This board-level reference platform is intended to optimise hardware for the JavaOS and provide a consistent stage for Java applications.

Also at the show, Sun is expected to offer a road map for products from recently acquired information-appliance maker Diba that will be aimed at the consumer market.

At JIBE, Oracle plans to describe Java enhancements in its upcoming Web Application Server 3.1, according to sources close to the company. A new cartridge that appears as a Java object is expected to be a part of the company's plan.

One financial analyst tracking Java start-up companies says he has seen an emerging trend in the business plans that are now crossing his desk. Development tools are no longer the dominant trend, he says.

"Compared to last year's JavaOne [conference], at which over half of the products were developer tools, we're now seeing companies focusing on applications," says Ted Schlein, Java-fund partner at the California-based Kleiner Perkins Caulfield & Byers venture-capital company. "The market has learned that not everything in the world needs to be rewritten in Java. But for distributed, multiuser, multidesktop applications, it's hot."

In fact, most of the adoption of Java is being driven by committments from upper management to cross-platform development, rather than by a groundswell of support from rank and file members of the IT community.

JIBE will also be the launching pad for a variety of other software packages, including the following:

-- GraphOn's Go-Joe, a thin-client X server for Java, provides quick access to Unix and X-Windows applications from Java-enabled devices.

-- Innotech Multimedia's NetResults is a Java-based Web engine.

-- InterSoft's J-Bpm tool analyses business processes.

-- Neoware's NeoStation NC provides a small-footprint ultra-thin client.

-- Sybase' Jaguar CTS component-transaction server offers built-in support for Java/JavaBeans, ActiveX, C/C++, and CORBA.

-- Visualize's DataVista Select builds 3-D graphs, charts, and interactive data visualization on to a Web site.

-- WebLogic offers packaged implementation of JavaSoft's Remote Method Invocation software specification.

Sun Microsystems, in Palo Alto, California, can be reached at http://www.sun.com.

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