Intel says it has broken Moore's Law with new flash-memory chips

Intel, the company which spawned Moore's law - dictating that the power and complexity of silicon chips would double every 18 months - says it has superceded that law with a breakthrough in flash-memory technology that will allow two bits of information to be stored in each cell of a memory chip instead of one. The new 64Mbit StrataFlash memory is expected to dramatically alter that law, allowing for more rapid expansion. According to a company statement, Intel now will be 'one chip generation ahead of the industry.'

Intel has announced a breakthrough in flash-memory technology that it says will allow two bits of information to be stored in each cell of a memory chip instead of one.

The new 64Mbit StrataFlash memory allows Intel to market higher density flash memory products for less money than traditional components that have a single bit per cell, according to the company.

The innovation also bests Moore's Law, named for Intel co-founder and chairman emeritus Gordon Moore. More than 30 years ago, Moore said in an interview that the power and complexity of silicon chips would double every 18 months, rendering previous chips - and therefore computers - obsolete. His prediction has thus far proven true and provided a benchmark by which corporate customers, consumers and computer manufacturers could plan.

StrataFlash is expected to dramatically alter that law, allowing for more rapid expansion. According to a company statement, Intel now will be "one chip generation ahead of the industry."

Intel can be reached on the World Wide Web at http://www.intel.com/.

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