Sculley Says Jobs Making Right Moves

Steve Jobs is on the right track to revive Apple Computer Inc. and should focus the company on network computers and servers, former Apple CEO John Sculley told IDG News Service on Friday. 'Steve Jobs is making all the right moves,' said Sculley, who helped oust Jobs from Apple in 1985 and now is a partner in investment firm Sculley Brothers and chairman of digital imaging start-up Live Picture Inc.

Steve Jobs is on the right track to revive Apple Computer Inc. and should focus the company on network computers and servers, former Apple CEO John Sculley told IDG News Service on Friday.

"Steve Jobs is making all the right moves," said Sculley, who helped oust Jobs from Apple in 1985 and now is a partner in investment firm Sculley Brothers and chairman of digital imaging start-up Live Picture Inc.

Sculley said that for Apple to turn its flagging fortunes around, Jobs should first stabilize the business financially and then build network computers (NCs) and servers.

It is through sales of products like those that Apple might be able to reverse its flagging fortunes in some key markets, for example, education, he said explaining that "There is no way you are going to hold on to the school market with the Macintosh."

Though no specifics have been detailed, Jobs is reportedly readying a plan for Apple to roll out a family of NCs, or low-cost clients that rely on servers for much of their functionality.

Jobs returned to Apple late last year as an advisor when Apple purchased his company Next Software Inc. Jobs was recently installed as Apple's interim CEO.

"If anyone knows how to build these innovative products [NCs], it's Steve Jobs," Sculley said, adding that Apple's operating system used in the company's handheld Newton device is well suited for use in NCs.

Sculley, who after a decade at Apple's helm was ousted in 1993, is held responsible for leading Apple down several wrong strategic paths. Such missteps included the decision not to pursue market share by licensing the MacOS at a much earlier date and the positioning of the Macintosh as a premium-priced machine, not a high volume, low-priced market share grabber.

But now, with the full plate of startups his new company is currently putting together, Sculley is not focused on Apple. "It's their problem now," he said.

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