Rhapsody soon in hands of local developers

Between 150 and 200 local developers should soon be working with the new DR1 release of Rhapsody, Apple Computer's next-generation OS. Rhapsody currently runs only on high-end Mactintoshes, but a version of Rhapsody for Intel hardware and a Windows version of the Yellow Box - the part of Rhapsody based on Next Software's OpenStep development environment - are as a little as a month away. Although Rhapsody has been positioned mainly as a server OS, Apple New Zealand is already pitching its cross-platform development features to programmers.

Between 150 and 200 local developers should soon be working with the new DR1 release of Rhapsody, Apple Computer’s next-generation OS.

Rhapsody currently runs only on high-end Mactintoshes, but a version of Rhapsody for Intel hardware and a Windows version of the Yellow Box - the part of Rhapsody based on Next Software’s OpenStep development environment - are as a little as a month away.

Apple New Zealand has already been working with existing Next developers, including several in Auckland and the Black Albatross Group at Otago University, and will bring them into its programme alongside its registered developers, says Apple spokesman John Holley.

Although Rhapsody has been positioned mainly as a server OS, Apple New Zealand is already pitching its cross-platform development features to programmers.

“We’re talking especially to developers who are doing stuff going into education - it would be be good to get people developing administrative systems using Rhapsody. Schools often use Macs for education and PCs for administration and we’ll to be able to say to developers, use this to develop a software package that’ll run everywhere in almost all schools.”

“Basically, this is a product that lets developers broaden their market.”

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