Internet World: Adobe to overhaul PDF in quest for paperless office

Adobe Systems will introduce a new forms technology next month as part of the push of its Portable Document Format (PDF) into the enterprise. The push is coming from Adobe's new enterprise division, which oversees both its Adobe FrameMaker high-end publishing tool and Adobe Acrobat Exchange, which is used to create PDFs. PDF is traditionally thought of as a static document container, storing fonts, graphics, and layout of a file, but the company plans to use the expanding infrastructure for deploying their dynamic, personalized Web sites that deliver customised on-the-fly PDFs. Adobe's strategy includes leveraging a document layer above the current IT infrastructure already in existence in most companies.

Adobe Systems will introduce a new forms technology next month as part of the push of its Portable Document Format (PDF) into the enterprise, the company has said at Fall Internet World.

The push is coming from Adobe's new enterprise division, which oversees both its Adobe FrameMaker high-end publishing tool and Adobe Acrobat Exchange, which is used to create PDFs.

PDF is traditionally thought of as a static document container, storing fonts, graphics, and layout of a file, but the company plans to use the expanding infrastructure for deploying their dynamic, personalized Web sites that deliver customized on-the-fly PDFs.

Adobe's strategy includes leveraging a document layer above the current IT infrastructure already in existence in most companies.

For example, a customer can go to a Web site and an on-the-fly PDF can be generated with the products they are interested in.

The combination of personalized PDFs with interactive forms capabilities will enable many companies to move toward becoming paperless, according to Adobe.

"It allows companies to leverage the investments they're making and move their customer base from a paper product to an electric process," says George A. Cacioppo Jr., vice president and general manager of Adobe's enterprise division.

The advantage of using PDF over traditional Web technologies is that a company can better control the look and feel of the documents their end-users receive, he says.

Adobe, in San Jose, California, can be reached at http://www.adobe.com/.

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