Optimism rules as new year looms

What an optimistic lot you are. Of 30 respondents to our Computerworld 1000 Survey, 24 believe next year will be better than this year. Of the remaining six, three think there will be no change, two say they will be under more pressure and one thinks it will be a harder year. No one thinks 1998 will be worse on the whole than 1997. Most respondents want Santa to leave them a laptop in their stocking this year - one wag wants a 1000MHz processor in his. Holidays are also popular, with one respondent going so far as to want time off until after the year 2000. Cars and cash are the next most popular, with only one IT person wanting a mountain bike.

What an optimistic lot you are. Of 30 respondents to our Computerworld 1000 Survey, 24 believe next year will be better than this year.

Of the remaining six, three think there will be no change, two say they will be under more pressure and one thinks it will be a harder year. No one thinks 1998 will be worse on the whole than 1997.

Most respondents want Santa to leave them a laptop in their stocking this year — one wag wants a 1000MHz processor in his. Holidays are also popular, with one respondent going so far as to want time off until after the year 2000. Cars and cash are the next most popular, with only one IT person wanting a mountain bike.

We asked respondents what they thought the big trends would be for 1998 and received a variety of responses, from bandwidth to network computers. The millennium bug and the Internet are the highest scorers, with network computers not far behind. One person believes knowledge management will be the big trend, with one person wishing for a universal log-in for network resources. Only one person picked Windows NT as a big trend for 1998.

Canterbury Health’s Faron Woolf sees the Internet as only in its infancy.

“We’re just at the beginning,” he believes, saying that people will now want to make money out of it. Canterbury Health will still probably look at the Internet as an information tool rather than as a business tool, at least in the short term.

“Our focus is slightly different — we’ll probably use it as a medium to deliver information to clinical people outside Canterbury Health.”

Eleven of the respondents name Y2K as the single biggest issue facing IT managers next year, with other notable mentions including bandwidth, hardware keeping up with software, e-commerce and Windows 98.

Suzuki New Zealand systems manager Peter Rofe hopes Y2K will just be a hassle rather than a problem. “Half of it’s actually completed,” says Rofe, who says that the automotive industry has already faced its year 2000 deadline when it comes to three-year warranties.

“It’s more the smaller suppliers that are going to let people down. Any major company that’s not compliant by the end of 1998 just won’t be around in the year 2000. They’ve left it too late.”

Only one person believes the total cost of ownership is the single biggest issue for 1998 and only one respondent pointed to the “Microsoft versus the rest of the world” wrangle.

Next year, the Year of the Dragon, looks set to be an interesting one.

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