IE hard to take out of Win95, says MS. But is that a bug or a feature?

Microsoft has given federal Judge Thomas Jackson a detailed demonstration intended to show that it is difficult to remove its Internet Explorer Web browser from the Windows 95 operating system since both programs are thoroughly intertwined. In the contempt-of-court hearing in in Washington, Microsoft Vice President David Cole used a laptop computer to refute the Department of Justice (DOJ) position that the Internet software can be easily removed. Cole showed the court that the 'add/remove' procedure only removes the ability to easily access Internet Explorer leaving most of the program within Windows 95. The DOJ contends Microsoft flouted Jackson's order, when it offered PC makers the choice of a crippled version of Windows 95 without the browser, or an outdated, 2-year-old version of Windows 95. The DOJ is seeking to have the company held in contempt and fined US$1 million a day if it fails to comply.

Microsoft has given federal Judge Thomas Jackson a detailed demonstration intended to show that it is difficult to remove its Internet Explorer Web browser from the Windows 95 operating system since both programs are thoroughly intertwined.

In the contempt-of-court hearing in the US District Court in Washington, D.C., Microsoft Vice President David Cole used a laptop computer to refute the Department of Justice (DOJ) position that the Internet software can be easily removed, according to a report on the Dow Jones News Service.

DOJ expert witness Glenn Weadock had used the "Add/Remove" program within Windows 95 to remove IE, a procedure which Microsoft contends does not satisfy Jackson's Dec. 11 preliminary injunction, ordering the software company to stop requiring computer markers to install IE as a condition of licensing Windows 95.

Cole showed the court that the add/remove procedure only removes the ability to easily access Internet Explorer leaving most of the program within Windows 95, Dow Jones said.

The DOJ contends Microsoft flouted Jackson's order, when it offered PC makers the choice of a crippled version of Windows 95 without the browser, or an outdated, 2-year-old version of Windows 95. The DOJ is seeking to have the company held in contempt and fined US$1 million a day if it fails to comply.

Jackson scheduled the ongoing hearing, which will now extend until next week, in order to decide if Microsoft is in contempt of court, asked each side to present only one witness.

He repeatedly questioned Microsoft's defense strategy, saying that it focuses too much on the prosecution's interpretation of his ruling and not on the wording of the ruling itself. Jackson also reportedly wondered why Microsoft has not asked the court to clarify what steps it needs to take in order to comply with his ruling.

Microsoft's position has been that it is in compliance with Jackson's order.

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