Computerworld readership up again

Computerworld has posted another readership gain in the latest PrintScope national publications readership survey released last week. The figure of 63,000 readers sets a new record for Computerworld and represents its fifth straight rise in this benchmark six-monthly survey.

Computerworld has posted another readership gain in the latest PrintScope national publications readership survey released last week.

The figure of 63,000 readers sets a new record for Computerworld and represents its fifth straight rise in this benchmark six-monthly survey.

“This result is a strong endorsement of our editorial mission to put IT issues in a business context, and help our readers in their quest to deliver real business benefits from their IT investments,” says Computerworld managing editor Don Hill.

“The last two years have seen big changes in Computerworld’s coverage. Our emphasis on business impact has been complemented by increasing analysis of technology trends and the introduction of a number of local columnists who have helped New Zealand users understand the local impact of IT developments on their businesses.”

Computerworld’s readership rose 3% in the past six months and is a full 17% higher than the same period last year.

Other publications in the survey posted declines. Infotech Weekly dropped 5% from six months ago and 11% from the same period last year while Bits and Bytes was down 7% on the last survey. Computerworld was also comfortably ahead of newly listed Netguide which debuted with just 55,000 readers.

Computerworld’s sister publication PC World re-entered the survey after a six-month absence with a readership of 111,000 compared to 103,000 in its last showing a year ago. PC World had been withdrawn temporarily from this survey following changes to the survey methodology which had attempted to measure the readership of both the New Zealand and US editions. The US edition which is sold in New Zealand represents less than 3% of the combined circulation.

In a press release, survey operator ACNielsen.McNair and JICNaR, the industry committee overseeing this survey, said it had abandoned its attempt to separately measure readership of the New Zealand and US editions because the methodology used had led to unreliable results and because the potential readership of the US edition in this market was clearly “insignificant”. The latest readership figure is the combined unduplicated result of responses to both mastheads in the survey.

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