Australian university to use Cardinal's Jade

The popularity of Cardinal Group's Jade has been reinforced with three new tertiary institutions - including one in Australia - using the product this year. Jade, a completely object-oriented (OO), integrated application development environment, both builds and runs industrial-strength applications entirely on mass-produced hardware.

The popularity of Cardinal Group’s Jade has been reinforced with three new tertiary institutions — including one in Australia — using the product this year.

Jade, a completely object-oriented (OO), integrated application development environment, both builds and runs industrial-strength applications entirely on mass-produced hardware.

Cardinal Group announced recently that not only would Nelson Polytechnic and Auckland’s Unitec Institute of Technology now use Jade, but that Victoria University in Melbourne will teach Jade this year.

Victoria University senior computer science lecturer John Horwood says Jade is one of the best products the university has seen. He says Jade provides an easy-to-use system which enables pure OO design to be implemented in an application.

Keith Cowan of Cardinal says the Victoria University move is an extremely important development for Jade’s programme in Australia.

“It is the students at these universities and polytechnics who will be the real beneficiaries of the organisation’s vision in choosing Jade, because they will have gained a wide range of skills in OO with a market-leading product.”

Horwood agrees. He believes teaching OO using Jade will make his students very marketable.

Victoria University will use Jade mainly to teach OO design. Horwood says that from the time object-oriented databases appeared, the university has been involved with them.

“And we haven’t had much luck.”

He says while there are tools which provide an interface to the user, with Jade, “in a sense, the case tools are in-built”.

“So it provides you with the opportunity to take an object-oriented model and implement it immediately in a Jade environment. That appeals to us because it means students aren’t just doing the design and then not seeing the consequences of it.”

In the past it has used a mixture of C++, O2 database and Case (software engineering) tools to teach OO.

“With C++ students have to map a design to a certain implementation, with Jade the design model is the implementation model.”

He says that so far the implementation is going well.

“A lot of commercial systems start to collapse under the usage universities put them under, but the architecture of the system, the way it’s designed, would suggest to me that we’re not going to run into that problem here. But that’s just speculation at this stage.”

Unitec will teach Jade in the first semester of this year in object-oriented programming. It also plans to use it in a second course in the second semester in object-oriented analysis.

Dan Hawthorn, of Unitec’s information systems and computing department, says Jade has a strong OO model rather than a hybrid model, develops Windows applications and has a truly integrated OO database.

Nelson Polytechnic will initially use Jade to prototype some administrative applications for its own use, then use Jade to teach object orientation and database skills.

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