CORE criticises Clinton Internet plan

The Internet Council of Registrars (CORE) has added its voice to the choir lamenting that the Clinton Administration draft plan for managing the administrative tasks of the Internet is insufficiently international. The draft plan, or green paper, was presented in January by Clinton's special Internet advisor Ira Magaziner. It considers how best to move responsibility for the administrative tasks of the Internet from their origins in American academia to a more broadly representative system.

The Internet Council of Registrars (CORE) has added its voice to the choir lamenting that the Clinton Administration draft plan for managing the administrative tasks of the Internet is insufficiently international.

The draft plan, or green paper, was presented in January by Clinton's special Internet advisor Ira Magaziner. The green paper considers how best to move responsibility for the administrative tasks of the Internet from their origins in American academia to a more broadly representative system.

Internet stakeholders that have been jockeying to influence the decision include CORE, which is composed of 87 registrars in 23 countries and is the brainchild of the Internet Society, the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) and the Internet Policy Oversight Committee (POC).

CORE irked many when, while the US administration was mulling its options, it activated its own proposal to register companies for seven new generic top-level domains, such as .store and .firm. The green paper, announced in January, was seen by many as a slap in the face for CORE, and at least one CORE member jumped ship after the draft plan became public.

Today, CORE formally made known its objections to the green paper. One of the group's chief reservations, expressed in a printed statement, is that that the plan "ignores the international nature of the Internet." This sentiment echoes that of the European Union, which issued its own response earlier today.

According to CORE, the green paper also perpetuates and consolidates the power of Network Solutions Inc., which runs the current domain-name system, and proposes new regulatory processes while ignoring existing international mechanisms.

Magaziner has said he will consider all comments filed in response to the green paper and will redraft it within an unspecified timeframe.

A copy of the green paper and related information may be obtained at http://www.ntia.doc.gov/ntiahome/domainname/dnsdrft.htm/.

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