JavaLobby watchdog scrutinises Sun's Behavior

The JavaLobby will set up the 'Open Process Grievance Center' to monitor Sun Microsystems' behavior as a steward of the Java platform, according to the association's founder Rick Ross. The JavaLobby has until now put pressure on Microsoft to try and stop the software giant from splintering the Java Language. However, it has also turned its attentions to Sun's JavaSoft division, following the release of the JDK 1.2, Beta 3, which includes a completely new set of classes that have not gone through the 'open process.'

The JavaLobby will set up the "Open Process Grievance Center" to monitor Sun Microsystems' behavior as a steward of the Java platform, according to the association's founder Rick Ross.

The JavaLobby has until now put pressure on Microsoft to try and stop the software giant from splintering the Java Language.

However, it has also turned its attentions to Sun's JavaSoft division, following the release of the JDK 1.2, Beta 3, which includes a completely new set of classes that have not gone through the "open process."

Sun included a package for JPEG functionality which came directly from imaging company Kodak and had not been previously documented.

"Sun [is] asking for the public trust by asking for ISO status," said Ross. "We expect them to live up to that trust."

Therefore, the 16,000-strong Java Industry watchdog will establish the Grievance Center, which will act as a single point of examination of the computer giant's behavior as International Standards Organisation (ISO) publicly available specification (PAS) submitter.

Meanwhile Sun's JavaSoft division will remove the class called Java.awt.image.codec which effects the loading and saving of JPEG images in its next release of the JDK 1.2 core class.

The classes will now be included in com.sun. which is an extension to the core JDK 1.2.

"It was a mistake on our part," said Andrew Shikiar, spokesperson for Sun's JavaSoft Division. "We added some code to the beta release of the JDK that had not gone thought the open process, but we are correcting the mistake in the next release."

JavaSoft officials confirmed that the classes did include some native code from Kodak.

Ross said that, although he was satisfied that Sun had addressed the problem, he felt there is still a need to provide a single point to monitor the companies activities.

"People have a lot of trouble having faith in God, so why should they trust a multinational," said Ross. "I would like to see to checks and balances to correct them when they go wrong."

The JavaLobby can be contacted at http://www.javalobby.org/.

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