Domainz and others to seek places on new Internet governing body

Country domain registries from the Asia-Pacific region are set to make their pitch for representation on the Internet's new governing body at a meeting next month. The US Department of Commerce has mandated the creation of a not-for-profit corporation to replace the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). It says interested parties such as registries should be represented 'and since these constituencies are international, we would expect the board of directors to be broadly representative of the global Internet community.'

Country domain registries from the Asia-Pacific region are set to make their pitch for representation on the Internet's new governing body at a meeting next month.

The US Department of Commerce has mandated the creation of a not-for-profit corporation to replace the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA).

The department's policy statement, a follow-up to the green paper released for comment in January, calls for the private sector to appoint an interim board for the body, which would officially assume responsibility for management of the domain name space. The policy says interested parties such as registries should be represented "and since these constituencies are international, we would expect the board of directors to be broadly representative of the global Internet community."

The new corporation would also address many of the issues raised in the green paper - but left out of the policy after criticism that the US government was dictating policy. These include possible new generic top-level domains (gTLDs) and the rights and responsibilities of country code registries such as New Zealand's Domainz.

Domainz manager Patrick O'Brien has just returned from Europe, where registry managers have formed a lobby group which will seek to represent their interests on the new governing body. He says registries in this region have been slower to get together, but expects a meeting during a conference in Geneva at the end of July will result in a joint representation to the new body.

"From a country registry point of view, I don't think country registries are interested in what happens with the new gTLDs, but they are interested in what happens to country registries," says O'Brien. "Does it mean we have to contract with them? Does it mean there are charges applied to country registries to fund this new body? What sort of representation will country registries have?"

O'Brien acknowledges that views within the region are likely to differwidely. Even the nearest country code registry, in Australia, runs very different policies - refusing to register any name it deems to be "generic" and charging $A300 for same-day registration of names.

O'Brien says Domainz achieved same-day registration for every application it received last month - and at the same time passed 20,000 domains under .nz. The number of US-registered domains passed two million last month.

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