Telecom tip hand on ADSL domain names

While Telecom is being publicly cagey about when and if it will move forward on ADSL, the company still apparently sees enough mileage in it to have registered two ADSL-related Internet domains. Last month, adsl.net.nz and adsl.co.nz were registered by Tele-com Internet Services. Telecom spokesman Glen Sowry confessed to having been surprised by news of the new domains but was later able to confirm that Telecom Services had requested the domains for use with a Website for participants in ADSL trials.

While Telecom is being publicly cagey about when and if it will move forward on ADSL, the company still apparently sees enough mileage in it to have registered two ADSL-related Internet domains.

Last month, adsl.net.nz and adsl.co.nz were registered by Tele-com Internet Services. Telecom spokesman Glen Sowry confessed to having been surprised by news of the new domains but was later able to confirm that Telecom Services had requested the domains for use with a Website for participants in ADSL trials.

He says, however, that “the status quo remains” on Telecom’s ADSL plans.

“The commercial decision has not been made on when and if ADSL is rolled out on a commercial basis,” says Sowry.

Jack Matthews, CEO of Tele-com’s fledgling Wellington rival, the cable-equipped Saturn Communications, says Telecom’s dilemma is a commercial, rather than a technical, issue.

“If you’re Telecom, it is the way to go. It certainly makes more sense to go ADSL than it does to build a whole new network,” says Matthews. “Ultimately, it will work technically. They may have to do a bit of network enhancement, shorten their copper runs and clean them up, but it will work.

“Whether the price comes down to a point where people are willing to pay for it is the issue. I think we all face that issue, no matter what kind of bandwidth we put into the home. So we don’t have any real issues with ADSL as a technology. If it becomes economical, we could jump into ADSL as fast as anyone.

“We have a copper network in addition to our coaxial network, and our longest copper run is about half a kilometre. So if anyone’s positioned to offer ADSL, it’s us.”

Meanwhile, Auckland Internet service company MultiNet is only three weeks away from launching an RADSL (rate-adapted digital subscriber line) service for business customers, which the company was pitching as a VPN and extranet solution at last week’s BizCom exhibition.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments
[]