Deutsche Telekom to equip 70,000 phone lines with ADSL

Like New Zealand Telecom, Germany's Deutsche Telekom has extended its trials of ADSL - but on a much bigger scale. Vendors have been chosen to equip some 70,000 copper phone lines in eight German cities with ADSL technology by the end of 1999. The vendors will install ADSL modems in the carrier's backbone network, and also provide end-users with ADSL modems.

Deutsche Telekom has selected three sets of vendors to provide the equipment for its expanded trials of ADSL (asymmetric digital subscriber line) technology.

The vendors will equip some 70,000 copper phone lines in eight German cities with ADSL technology by the end of 1999, according to Deutsche Telekom spokesman Wilfried Seibel, considerably expanding the number of customers who can try out high-bandwidth applications over standard copper phone wires. End-users in Bonn, Cologne, Dortmund and Düsseldorf are already taking part in Deutsche Telekom's first ADSL trial.

Deutsche Telekom chose Fujitsu's German subsidiary, Fujitsu Telecom Deutschland GmbH (FTD), and Orckit Communications Ltd. to provide equipment for 35,000 lines, according to a Fujitsu spokesman. The other two groups are Israeli provider ECI Telecom Ltd. working with Germany's DeTeWe AG, and Siemens AG.

Financial details of the order were not disclosed.

The IT companies will install ADSL modems in the carrier's backbone network, and also provide end-users with ADSL modems. By next year, the technology will be deployed at 43 network nodes in Berlin, Hamburg, Düsseldorf, Cologne, Bonn, Frankfurt, Stuttgart and Munich, Seibel said.

ADSL technology allows copper phones lines to transmit data at speeds up to 300 times faster than conve/ntional modems, Deutsche Telekom said. With ADSL modems, data is transmitted at speeds of up to 8Mbits over the network to the end-users, and at a speeds of up to 768Kbit/s in the other direction.

A Deutsche Telekom trial of ADSL involving 450 businesses and private households was launched in March. Participating private customers are using ADSL modems for rapid Internet access, and can also download selected multimedia services such as music video clips, three-dimensional animation and multimedia games from Deutsche Telekom's Internet provider T-Online. Business customers are using ADSL for applications such as teleworking, video-conferencing and LAN-to-LAN connections.

Separately, Siemens AG and Deutsche Telekom are running a trial of ADSL technology at a student dormitory in the city of Münster, said Rainer Schönrock, spokesman with Siemens' public networks group. From their dorm rooms, the 100 participants can hook up to live lectures given at the University of Münster, and have fast Internet access.

Deutsche Telekom, in Bonn, Germany, can be reached on the World Wide Web at http://www.dtag.de/.

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Market Place

[]