Microsoft wants to 'innovate' Java

Microsoft views Java as a productive programming language and will continue to support it as long as it can make enhancements that improve it, says the company's director of product management for development tools. But Tom Button acknowledges that J++ developers do face the potential risk that the company will lose interest in Java if it can't "innovate" the language independently of the dictates of Sun Microsystems.

Microsoft views Java as a productive programming language and will continue to support it as long as it can make enhancements that improve it, says the company’s director of product management for development tools .

But Tom Button acknowledged that J++ developers do face the potential risk that the company will lose interest in Java if it can’t “innovate” the language independently of the dictates of Sun Microsystems .

Button was reacting to a ruling in Sun’s suit over Microsoft’s Java license; among the judge’s requirements was that Microsoft include a warning that the lawsuit could hinder its ability to continue its Windows-oriented implementation of Java.

“Our intent is to support Java and make it a great Windows programming tool,” Button said.

No other programming language is controlled by only one vendor, he said.

Microsoft may be holding out a threat of dropping support for Java if court rulings go against the company, but it isn’t likely to follow through, said Larry Perlstein, an analyst at Dataquest in San Jose, California.

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