MS/DOJ: MS ends cross-examination of economist

Microsoft has ended its cross-examination of economist Frederick Warren-Boulton, who took the stand for his fifth and probably last day of painstaking questioning in the government's antitrust case against Microsoft. Microsoft grilled Warren-Boulton over, among other issues, his 89 pages of written testimony in which he sets out his argument that the software giant is a monopoly power and has engaged in practices that impede the commercial opportunities of rivals.

Microsoft has ended its cross-examination of economist Frederick Warren-Boulton, who took the stand for his fifth and probably last day of painstaking questioning in the government's antitrust case against Microsoft.

Now Warren-Boulton is slated to be questioned, on redirect testimony, by a government lawyer. This questioning is expected to last several hours.

Microsoft grilled Warren-Boulton over, among other issues, his 89 pages of written testimony in which he sets out his argument that the software giant is a monopoly power and has engaged in practices that impede the commercial opportunities of rivals.

Due up next on the stand is Java creator James Gosling, a Sun Microsystems fellow and vice president. The questioning of Gosling is likely to focus on Microsoft's alleged misuse of the Java language, said sources close to the trial. Gosling's testimony is due to be released before he takes the stand.

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