alt.cw: The high-tech bus stop

People waiting for a bus usually have no idea whether it's running on time - or even whether they've missed it entirely. But riders in Bellevue, Washington, can see real-time bus arrival information on monitors like those in airports. All 1,300 city buses have vehicle-location devices that feed the Transit Watch system, which is part of the Puget Sound area's Smart Trek intelligent transportation project. Boeing, which is a major employer in the area, is installing three Transit Watch monitors at its facilities.

People waiting for a bus usually have no idea whether it’s running on time — or even whether they’ve missed it entirely. But riders in Bellevue, Washington, can see real-time bus arrival information on monitors like those in airports. All 1,300 city buses have vehicle-location devices that feed the Transit Watch system, which is part of the Puget Sound area’s Smart Trek intelligent transportation project. Boeing, which is a major employer in the area, is installing three Transit Watch monitors at its Renton, Wash., facilities.

Greatest hits

Some alt.cw favorites from 1998:

Tom Friddell, a self-professed math geek, has uncovered the secrets to winning the Monopoly board game. Friddell used MathSoft Inc.’s Mathcad software to figure out the probability of landing on each of the Monopoly squares. For example, the most frequently landed-on property is Illinois Avenue, making it extremely profitable to own.

Once your mouse glides on this surface, it will never go back to that old rubber pad again. FiberLok Inc. has applied its fiber-coating technology to make mouse pads look and feel like handwoven Persian rugs. Mouse rugs can be ordered from http://www.mouserug.com for US$19.95.

NCR Corp.’s Knowledge Lab in London has developed the Microwave Bank, a microwave oven that can be used to pay bills, transfer money, surf the Web and get E-mail. The Internet appliance has a touch screen and voice-recognition software. Push-button control for speed surfers

Is that old mouse slowing you down? Kensington Technology Group in San Mateo, California, offers the WebRacer input device ($59.99) for faster navigation of Web pages. It features a touch pad, navigational buttons and six preset buttons for favorite sites (much like a car radio).

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