MacOS X Server will spark Apple push

Apple Computer New Zealand will wait until the end of March, when MacOS X Server ships, to attack the server market, but general manager Paul Johnston says Apple's local server business probably quadrupled in the last quarter. MacOS X Server will ship with a native version of the open source Web server Apache, along with WebObjects. Licensing complications are reportedly the cause of the delay in its release.

Apple Computer New Zealand will wait until the end of March, when MacOS X Server ships, to attack the server market, but general manager Paul Johnston says Apple's local server business probably quadrupled in the last quarter.

Apple's offerings in the server space took an upturn with the release last year of AppleShare IP 6, which the company claimed outperformed Windows NT on file transfers, but MacOS X Server, which was launched by Apple CEO Steve Jobs at Macworld Expo, is its most compelling server software offering in years.

Jobs used the OS, which is effectively a scrubbed-up version of NextStep and shares its roots in BSD Unix, to stream QuickTime video to 50 iMacs, and to run applications on a diskless "client" iMac. Rumours suggest the main release of the OS late this year will be markedly different to the Server version.

MacOS X Server will ship with a native version of the open source Web server Apache and the former Next application development environment WebObjects. Licensing complications are reportedly the cause of the delay in its release.

The hardware end of Apple's server push will be the new blueberry-and-cream G3 Macintosh range, which are here now but are heavily back-ordered and will not be available in numbers until around the time MacOS X is released. The range, described by Johnston as "the most expandable Macintosh ever produced" will begin at $3696 plus GST.

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