NZ Post sells its admin system to Trinidad & Tobago

New Zealand Post has ported its in-house postal administration system to Windows NT Server and sold it to Trinidad and Tobago Post. This is the second international sale of Post Link, which runs on IBM's OS/2 operating system. The software is also used by Fiji Post. Post's James Grassick says adding support for Windows NT will give Post Link a wider market.

New Zealand Post has ported its in-house postal administration system to Windows NT Server and sold it to Trinidad and Tobago Post.

This is the second international sale of Post Link, which runs on IBM’s OS/2 operating system. The

software is also used by Fiji Post.

James Grassick, business solutions leader for the New Zealand Post transaction group, says adding support for Windows NT will give Post Link a wider market.

“Post Link had a Win-OS/2 layer so a lot of the code was easily portable to NT. If we’re selling it

internationally we have to have an NT version but we have been very happy with OS/2.

“The new version is targeted for our Trinidad proposal which will be installed in three months but Datacom, which is doing the work for us, has a working version today with Oracle Forms running Oracle database on an NT platform.”

Grassick says Post Link, which handles the rating of parcels, high-volume data processing and point of sale, can be adapted for use by other industries. For example, it handles motor registration for the Land Transport Safety Authority, and agency banking for the TSB through New Zealand Post’s Post Shop outlets.

It will also be used for a newly announced retail chain of book and stationery shops called Books and More New Zealand Post - a joint venture between New Zealand Post and Blue Star.

Using its electronic switching service Post Bank will also start selling tickets to rugby matches for the Waikato Chiefs. The e-commerce switch which also handles electronic transactions for Courier Post and an electronic billing service about to be piloted called E-bill, runs on the shareware operating system Linux. Grassick says the move to Linux was something of a “punt” but has turned out very well.

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