Windows Refund Day a fizzer but raises awareness

Windows Refund Day attracted little attention in New Zealand, but event organisers are happy with the result. "We wanted to raise awareness of the alternatives to Windows and the fact that users do have a choice and we did that," says Dr Raman, spokesman for Uniforum New Zealand, which organised the event.

Windows Refund Day attracted little attention in New Zealand, but event organisers are happy with the result.

“We wanted to raise awareness of the alternatives to Windows and the fact that users do have a choice and we did that,” says Dr Raman, spokesman for Uniforum New Zealand, which organised the event.

Fewer than 20 people turned out for Uniforum’s event and none had shrink-wrapped software to return to Microsoft.

As reported in Computerworld, a large number of PC users around the world were planning to return unused and unwanted Microsoft software as per a clause in the end-user licensing agreements (EULA) found with most Microsoft products. The clause says that if a user does not agree to the terms and conditions of the EULA he or she must contact the manufacturer for instructions on the return of unused software for a full refund. One Australian user did just that after buying a Toshiba notebook with Windows 95 included in the price and was rewarded with a full refund for his operating system.

February 15 was chosen as Windows Refund Day in an effort to co-ordinate users and attract media attention. In the US turnout was higher with hundreds of users parading in front of Microsoft offices around the country.

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