QuickTime Server adds languages, Linux ability

Just a few months after the launch of the first version, Apple Computer has announced an update to its open source QuickTime Streaming Server that improves performance, adds support for Linux, and offers localised versions in French, German and Japanese.

Just a few months after the launch of the first version, Apple Computer has announced the availability of an update to its QuickTime Streaming Server that improves performance, adds support for Linux, and offers localised versions in French, German and Japanese.

The upgrade, QuickTime Streaming Server version 1.0.1, can serve up 2,000

simultaneous audio and video streams to users dialing in to the Internet, doubling previous capacity, according to Apple. The product can be obtained in two versions: for free by itself, through Apple's open-source program; or as part of the Mac OS X Server, which includes the new QuickTime server update and is priced at US$499.

The open source version of the QuickTime server, like other components of the Mac OS X that are available under Apple's open-source program, can be downloaded for free (from http://www.publicsource.apple.com/project/streaming/). Developers can make modifications and sell commercial applications based on the Apple code, as long as they post the changes they make back to Apple. Apple then has the right to incorporate the changes in the base code.

Over 14,000 copies of the open-source version of the streaming server, officially dubbed Apple Open Source Streaming Server, have been downloaded since it was released two and a half months ago, according to Apple.

The new version will also run on the open source-based Linux operating system on top of machines that use Intel-compatible processors, Apple said.

The quick turnaround on an update to the QuickTime server follows up on Apple's avowed mission to take on the other big players on both the client and server side of the streaming media business. The competition includes RealNetworks Inc., whose streaming media product line includes the RealPlayer G2 and RealSystem G2 software; and Microsoft, which in May announced a Streaming Media division that groups together products such as Windows Media Player and Windows Media Tools.

The Apple QuickTime server, in order to support 2,000 multimedia streams, requires a 450MHz Power Macintosh G3 with ultra SCSI, four-port Ethernet and 512Mb of RAM.

On the client side, Apple's QuickTime 4.0 has also been available as a free download (at www.apple.com/quicktime) since May. The main new feature of QuickTime is the ability to play live broadcasts over the Internet. QuickTime runs on Windows and Mac machines.

Apple Computer Inc., based in Cupertino, California, can be reached at +1-408-996-1010 or on the Web at http://www.apple.com/.

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