Private cops freeze PCs

A new computer crime fighting service will "freeze" the scene of your computer-based offence and treat it with the same forensic rigour as any other crime. Computer Forensics aims to detect and analyse computer-based offences, and to present findings in a way acceptable in court.

A new computer crime fighting service will “freeze” the scene of your computer-based offence and treat it with the same forensic rigour as any other crime.

Computer Forensics, says chief executive Brian Eardley-Wilmot, has been formed to detect and analyse computer-based offences, and to present its findings in a way acceptable in court. When a -computer-based offence is suspected, “the scene must be frozen, as in the case of a murder. Every subsequent key stroke or switching on and off of a computer anywhere in the network has the potential to contaminate the evidence.”

Eardley-Wilmot established Computer Forensics with former policeman and computer security expert Allan Watt. Using software which Eardley-Wilmot says he cannot name, they “clone” the computer system as it stands.

The user can then continue with other work until the case goes to court.

To date, the company has worked on four cases, including malicious damage to a computer system’s data by an employee and the theft of intellectual property.

John Thackray, head of the Auckland electronic crimes unit, says he is happy for the likes of Computer Forensics to help companies “so long as it’s done to the same standard as we would do it”.

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