Cheaper NZ training could be moneyspinner

New Zealand could be on the verge of another educational moneyspinner, this time in IT training.

New Zealand could be on the verge of another educational moneyspinner, this time in IT training. With polytechnics and universities realising the profits of teaching foreign students, not to mention English language schools cashing in, the weak dollar presents even more opportunities. IT training provider New Horizons is planning an overseas marketing campaign because people are starting to come to New Zealand for IT courses after finding they cost substantially less here. New Horizons general manager Mark Douglas says one MCSE [Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer] customer from the US, now working in the luxury yacht industry, told him electronics courses here at $500 a day are half the $US400 a day fee in the US. One of New Horizon's sister organsiations in the US discovered it was cheaper to send a student here than for him to do part of his course in the US. "However we are probably three to six months away from being able to handle online bookings for instructor-led training here," says New Horizons' Douglas, who says the company expects demand from overseas. "This is another way to bring in export dollars," he says. The Auckland business manager of Comtech Educational Services, Janelle Connor, confirms a handful of cases of overseas people looking to gain IT training here, though there is no influx. However, there is "a good chance" of Comtech planning to globally market its courses to attract some. The marketing manager at Auldhouse Computer Training, Leanne Shuttleworth, says the same. "It would be a good marketing ploy," she says. ITANZ executive director Jim O'Neill likens what's happening in training to the IT job market. Overseas organisations do development in New Zealand or use New Zealanders to work online because it is cheaper than in the UK and US.

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