Aardvark claims security answer

Aucklander Bruce Simpson claims he has the answer to security for the citizen in the age of e-government -- but insists on keeping his authentication idea under wraps.

Aucklander Bruce Simpson claims he has the answer to security for the citizen in the age of e-government — but insists on keeping his authentication idea under wraps.

Simpson, who in his non-inventing life is editor of the Aardvark online IT/internet news publication, declines to give Computerworld any further hint of the technologies or approach used in his transaction/authentication system. But he boasts it “requires no biometrics, no extra hardware, no digital signatures, no encryption, but is able to authenticate any transaction with an extremely high level of confidence”.

Simpson claims two government agencies — “or perhaps you’d call them state-owned enterprises” — expressed interest in his authentication technology after he publicised it in Aardvark late last month in the course of criticism of the e-government strategy. But these unnamed agencies have so far been given no further information about the development than Simpson gave Computerworld.

He laments the treatment his invention has received from the Foundation for Research Science and Technology, to which he applied for development funding.

“The situation in New Zealand is so crazy that I was easily able to obtain a $30,000 technology grant for developing my small jet-engine business — but nobody is interested in the IT-related systems I’ve designed, which have vastly greater earnings potential.”

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