Internet, e-commerce where the big bucks are

Internet and e-commerce still offer the top-paying jobs, with average pay rises this year coming in well ahead of inflation.

Internet and e-commerce still offer the top-paying jobs, with average pay rises this year coming in well ahead of inflation.

The latest six-monthly salary survey by recruitment company Robert Walters says account managers in e-commerce can earn a staggering $200,000 pa. Internet architects can earn up to $120,000 in Auckland, says the agency, while salaries for senior Java developers are also reaching six figures. Agencies spoken to by Computerworld all say the skill sets in greatest demand remain Java, SQL, database administration and, increasingly, the Rational product set.

Robert Walters IT consultant Glenn Bratton says his agency’s pay increase findings seem to match the figures given by HR company Cubiks, which suggest average IT salary rates increased 9.1% in the year to March. “New growth areas such as e-commerce have improved, more probably as a result of supply and demand. IT is still seen as the industry with one of the fastest growing salary indices,” says Bratton. But he says there is little salary movement in some legacy-dependent areas.

Barry O’Brien of Auckland-based recruiters Enterprise says “hot technology” dominates the growth areas - both in demand and pay. “There is an absolute dearth of these people, so they are getting substantial increases in pay. In some cases the remuneration is astronomical for the very, very few, the very, very best,” he says.

Salaries can be “well in excess of $100,000” for those involved in designing complex internet and e-commerce solutions. However, traditional software engineers and programmers with older skills, such as 3GL database languages, some are seeing their salaries “moving backwards”.

Candle’s Auckland general manager Christine Fitchew says the increment in IT salaries is not what it was and only those with hard-to-find skills are receiving the biggest pay-rises. “People are moving into Microsoft environments, so the VB, SQL developers are asking for more. Systems programmers are dying out.”

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