Job shifters garner highest pay rises

If you want a pay rise, it might be best to change jobs. Cubiks' annual salary survey of 500 firms shows IT workers remaining in their jobs had an average 5.1% pay rise in the year to March, while average IT salary rates increased 9.1%.

If you want a pay rise, it might be best to change jobs.

Cubiks’ annual salary survey of 500 firms shows IT workers remaining in their jobs had an average 5.1% pay rise in the year to March, while average IT salary rates increased 9.1%.

“This [9.1% growth] is primarily driven by the wage rates of new appointees, people moving within the industry,” says Cubiks New Zealand head Kevin McBride. “It’s a clear example of the premiums commanded for skills in demand.”

Elsewhere, the survey by the human resources consultancy, formerly known as PA Consulting, suggests IT workers on average continue to enjoy pay rises well above inflation and those of non-IT workers (4.3%), though the difference is no longer as great as it was. Some sectors saw pay rises of just a few percent, while other recruiting agencies say the pay for some skill sets is even slipping back.

As with last year, Java remains the place to be, with salaries in excess of $85,000 still possible for developers. Programmers in general enjoyed average pay rises of 9%, experienced systems analysts received 4.7% and less experienced 8.1%, webmasters received 7.4%, database administrators 7.3%, systems administrators 6.6% and senior IT executives received 6.1% more, in line with other top bosses.

The lagging IT sectors include information systems managers up 4.4%, systems programmers 3.9%, computer operators 3.2% and network consultants 2.6%.

McBride confirms the advice to move around, but says some with less fashionable skills may be better off staying where they are.

Wellington regional director of Spherion recruitment Grahame Bilby confirms this advice, particularly if someone has accepted a job for far less than they were worth. While firms usually awarded pay increases to market rates once people had proved themselves, if they did not, people had to move. People may be offered $5000 to $7000 more than in their current job, so it may take several moves to “catch up”.

“But this is getting rare. There are lots of jobs around. It’s a matter of finding people with the right skills,” Bilby says.

Cubiks expects little change in the coming year, with demand for web-based and e-commerce work pushing pay rates up further. However, it says much depends on individual performance.

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