MS licensing change ‘mostly beneficial’

Microsoft software licensing changes, causing a revolt among users elsewhere in the world, appear to benefit most New Zealand organisations.

Microsoft software licensing changes, causing a revolt among users elsewhere in the world, appear to benefit most New Zealand organisations.

According to software licensing specialists, organisations that upgrade their Microsoft software three-and-a-half-yearly or more frequently benefit from the new regime, which comes into effect on October 1.

One local customer is relieved it has a Microsoft enterprise licensing agreement and won’t be heavily hit. The 1000-desktop organisation, which did not want to be named, has a select agreement so the new programme will have little effect.

In general, customers with current enterprise agreements will be better off when the changes kick in, says Auckland software licensing consultancy the Accordo Group. Accordo’s Vicky McCullough says New Zealand has the highest penetration of Microsoft’s upgrade advantage and enterprise advantage licences per capita in the world, and these customers will benefit from the change. Those who upgrade less frequently will face an increase in cost, she says.

But users in some countries are up in arms about the new regime. The Netwerk Gebruikersgroep Nederland (NGN), a group of Dutch systems administrators, says the cost of Microsoft software under the new policy will increase for 86% of its members.

The Accordo Group disputes NGN’s figures.

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Infrequent upgraders face MS licence price hike

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