BSA busts Japanese logistics company

The Business Software Alliance (BSA) has reported that a Japanese logistics company based in Bangkok has settled with BSA member Microsoft after it was found using illegal software.

          The Business Software Alliance (BSA) has reported that a Japanese logistics company based in Bangkok has settled with BSA member Microsoft after it was found using illegal software.

          Mitsubishi Logistics decided to settle a 1.5 million baht ($US33,000) case with the software giant after police officers from the Economic Crime Investigation Division (ECID) and BSA members found 24 PCs and one server using pirated software.

          The raid was based on evidence secured by BSA investigators following a report provided by the Department of Intellectual Property (DIP). As part of the settlement, the company paid both costs and damages, and legalised all illegal software used in the company. The company also undertook the decision to use only legal software in the future.

          The case started when the ECID, part of the National Police Office, received a complaint that Mitsubishi Logistics was using unlicensed copies of BSA members' software that included Microsoft Windows 98 Thai and Office 97 Thai.

          "With the support from the DIP and ECID, the BSA is increasing its end-user enforcement activities to tackle the businesses using illegal software. The BSA and Thai Government agencies' policy is to protect intellectual property for all parties. The BSA's policy is to educate, enforce and work with the policy makers to create awareness and respect to intellectual property rights," says Huey Tan, vice president, BSA. "We are investigating about 50 companies reported to be using illegal software. Once we secure enough evidence we will be conducting more raids."

          In order to assist users understand more about software piracy and keen to prevent illegal software use, ECID, DIP, the Association of Thai Computer Industry and the Association Thai Software Industry, have launched a joint campaign called Stop Now to warn the corporate user of the risks involved in using illegal software.

          "This campaign consists of direct mails, print advertisement and end user seminars and exhibitions. The Stop Now campaign advises users to conduct a software audit of their computer systems. The seminars aim to attract around 1000 participants and are scheduled to be held in June. There will also be an exhibition from BSA members offering special promotions on their products," adds Tan.

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