Oracle9i ease of use appeals to new customer

The Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS) is looking forward to ease of use and replication improvements as it plans a move to Oracle9i, database leader Oracle's latest release.

The Institute of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (IGNS) is looking forward to ease of use and replication improvements as it plans a move to Oracle9i, database leader Oracle’s latest release.

IGNS Wellington-based IT manager Graham Alderwick says the institute is migrating 80 disparate legacy databases to Oracle in pursuit of a general improvement in database administration.

Oracle promises cheaper maintenance and improved usability from Oracle 9i, which was released late last week. The new database boosts management for memory, storage and resources and is being touted by Oracle as “more self-tuning”.

That’s a trend that’s also being latched on to by Oracle rivals IBM, Microsoft and Sybase, as databases become increasingly commoditised.

The biggest potential cost saver is the ability of Oracle 9i to run on clusters of low-cost Intel servers. You don't have to change the application to run on a cluster.

Oracle, which leads the market in Australia and New Zealand, has been criticised over the past few months for its pricing model, which is based per power unit. Last August Connecticut-based consultancy Meta Group published a report stating that Oracle is three to five times more expensive than IBM’s DB2. IBM’s database is number two in Australasia.

With the launch of Oracle 9i, the pricing model has been changed to per processor which brings it in line with other database users.

Oracle is also hitting back by saying that 9i comes bundled with tools such as message queueing and OLAP which you have to buy from other vendors.

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