E-crime work goes on

Plans for co-operation among law-enforcement bodies, IT companies and users against electronic crime have begun to gel in the wake of June's e-crime conference.

Plans for co-operation among law-enforcement bodies, IT companies and users against electronic crime have begun to gel in the wake of June’s e-crime conference.

Participants in the forum (see E-crime: NZ no soft target) included police, security consultants, consultants Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu and EDS. Representatives of these organisations met again in late July, says Police spokesman Murray Sim.

“They confirmed their commitment to progress beyond the forum and to a combined response to e-crime problems,” he says. The groups represented on the panel have now been joined by ITANZ.

As a first stage, the parties will explore the establishment of a joint e-crime working group involving public and private-sector organisations. Deloittes’ representative suggested at the forum that a “national centre for cybercrime” be formed.

The parties will draw up a “framework” of New Zealand capabilities in prevention response, investigation and resolution of computer-assisted crimes, exploring sources of expertise in these different aspects and the opportunity for synergy among bodies. They will also plan for forums in other parts of the country, but more focused on specific sub-topics than the general forum in Wellington.

The next meeting of the e-crime group will be in early September.

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Tags e-crime

More about DeloittesDeloitte Touche TohmatsuDeloitte Touche TohmatsuEDS AustraliaITANZ

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