EDS momentum builds on Landonline data conversion

EDS is predicting June or August next year as the completion date for title information to be fed into the Landonline database. Survey information - the geographical layout of properties - will take longer to complete: that is expected about a year later.

EDS is predicting June or August next year as the completion date for title information to be fed into the Landonline database. Survey information — the geographical layout of properties — will take longer to complete: that is expected about a year later.

When Computerworld visited the Torrens House data conversion centre in Upper Hutt a week ago, EDS’s Landonline project manager, David Spaziani, said the title information task was 40% complete.

About 300 people are employed at Torrens House, taking data through a multi-stage process to make sure it is “clean” unduplicated, consistent and without error. The ground floor of the building is given over to survey conversion and the first floor to titles.

Titles data is entered twice from a scanned document by two different operators and the two versions checked for agreement. A separate quality assurance process checks on possible residual errors.

At present, Spaziani says, between 98% of data passes quality assurance at the first inspection, up from an earlier accuracy rate of 95%.

The staff work in teams of 20 and rotate among functions so they do not become too stale doing the same task day after day.

Capture of survey data also goes through several stages, but here the functions cannot be rotated, he explains, because they use different software tools, in which an operator has to have specific expertise.

Survey plans are first put through a “preparation” stage; then they are captured in digitised form and the captured data goes through a quality control check. Data is collected from many separate plans, and because the original survey readings were done by different people with different reference points, they may not match up exactly. An “adjustment” stage is therefore necessary, involving a complex weighting system for data from different sources.

All survey information is scanned and converted at Torrens House; some titles and all the “instruments” — other documents such as records of transfers — attached to the title are scanned partly by EDS and partly by Land Information New Zealand, sponsor and co-ordinator of the Landonline project.

The process suffered a serious interruption at the beginning of this year, with the slide into receivership of Terralink, the state-owned enterprise that EDS subcontracted to do the data conversion work. EDS picked up the ball and has employed 41 former Terralink staff.

EDS will be taking on about another 20 staff for titles over the next few weeks and about 20 people are still being sought for the more complex survey work, but there is no specific commitment to employ more ex-Terralink people, says marketing communications manager Suzanne Newton.

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