North Americans should recognise NZ research

Getting North American IT academics to take New Zealand research seriously is high on the agenda of Victoria University's Sid Huff, who has been appointed Australasia/Far East representative on the global council of the Association of Information Systems.

Getting North American IT academics to take New Zealand research seriously is high on the agenda of Victoria University’s Sid Huff, who has been appointed Australasia/Far East representative on the global council of the Association of Information Systems.

Professor Huff, head of Victoria’s school of information management, was elected by his peers in a web-based election. The AIS is a professional organisation founded in 1994 for academics specialising in information systems. Its aim is to advance knowledge in the use of IT to improve organisational performance and quality of life at work.

Huff, originally from Canada, says often North Americans can be inward looking and tend to discount IT research done in New Zealand. However, the issues here are the same as those faced everywhere, he says.

“I want to get people from other parts of the world, particularly the US and Canada, to recognise the importance of the research done here. We have to educate them that the issues and research here are applicable to them also.”

One of the few differentiators is New Zealand’s emphasis on small and medium-size businesses, because of the high number we have here.

Huff will attend twice-yearly global council meetings representing the views and agendas of the region.

Huff played a key role in the development of two new technology degrees that were launched in November by IT minister Paul Swain: the bachelor of information technology and master of information management.

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