Kiwi site wants your vote

With less than a month to go before the final votes are counted, New Zealand based science website SciTech Daily Review is running second only to NASA's Earth Observatory site in this year's Webby Awards.

With less than a month to go before the final votes are counted, New Zealand based science website SciTech Daily Review is running second only to NASA's Earth Observatory site in this year's Webby Awards.

The website, an distillation of science and technology news from around the web, is a finalist in the science section of the Webbys and is one of only two New Zealand sites to reach that stage this year, the other being its "sister" site, Arts and Letters Daily.

The Webbys have two categories for each section - a judged category and a popular vote category and SciTech Daily Review is trying to encourage as many New Zealanders to vote for it as it can, according to site managing editor Vicky Hyde.

"We're running second to NASA which isn't a bad place to be but we'd love it if everyone logged on and voted for us." Anyone is allowed to vote, however to ensure voters only get one vote per category a registration page must be filled in first.

While SciTech is running second in the Science section, Arts and Letters Daily is running third in the News section behind the BBC's page and an Israeli political site, Debka File.

Hyde's campaign, which includes a number of graphics and links for website owners to help spread the word, has been picked up by the likes of Sir Gil Simpson, founder of Jade Corporation, who has expressed his support.

SciTech had hoped to garner support by using the 'red socks' campaign - used as part of the last two America's Cup campaigns, but was told Team New Zealand had trademarked it, so instead it has opted to use a red Kiwi as the site's mascot.

Hyde describes the site as a "porthole" rather than a portal, something which occasionally leads to readers emailing her to point out the mistake.

"It's something the New York Times called Arts and Letters Daily - very narrow field of focus but great depth in that field. We're a porthole rather than a portal. I should put something up on the site to let people know so they don't keep pointing out our error."

Voters have until June 7 to cast their votes.

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