Supplyzone sells off assets

Former business-to-business IT marketplace Supplyzone's assets have been sold off, following unsuccessful attempts to sell the company's software and other e-commerce-enabling gear.

Former business-to-business IT marketplace Supplyzone’s assets have been sold off, following unsuccessful attempts to sell the company’s software and other e-commerce-enabling gear.

Supplyzone, established in 2000, stopped trading in February after investment capital needed to fund its continued operations couldn’t be raised.

The company’s IT assets were put up for sale, but, according to the liquidators’ report, the offers received weren’t acceptable to director Neil Taylor — also the company’s sole shareholder — so a conventional liquidation took place.

An auction of Supplyzone’s assets, including the applications that the service ran on, was held on June 27, says Lloyd Hayward, spokesman for liquidators Jeff Meltzer and Karen Mason. The proceeds are to be distributed to creditors, Hayward says.

Supplyzone was incorporated in May 2000 and went live in October that year, offering office hardware, software and accessories and e-commerce services.

In September of 2001 Supplyzone spokesman Roger Watson told Computerworld that typical sales were for five-figure sums and cited a $50,000 server sale as an example.

Watson said “large companies and several government departments” were Supplyzone’s main clients.

IDC analyst Darian Bird says New Zealanders’ relative lack of confidence about buying equipment online may have been a contributing factor to Supplyzone’s failure. “In the US, people are more confident about buying online — New Zealand people would rather go to a shop.”

Bird believes our reticence to buy online will decline in the future, particularly as more small and medium-sized enterprises go online and broadband links become more pervasive.

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