Little favour for Software Assurance

Despite clear rebellion from Microsoft customers to its Software Assurance licensing scheme, nearly half the respondents to a survey say they won't increase their reliance on open source software as a result.

Despite clear rebellion from Microsoft customers to its Software Assurance licensing scheme, nearly half the respondents to a survey say they won’t increase their reliance on open source software as a result.

Eighty-eight percent of respondents to an email survey of Computerworld subscribers conducted last week said they had not enrolled in Software Assurance. Twelve percent had.

Of those who hadn’t, 79% said they didn’t plan to, 10% said they did and 11% didn’t say.

Software Assurance is due to come into force at the end of this month. Those who sign up to it pay an upfront charge and an annual maintenance fee for the right to upgrade for two years. Those who don’t ultimately sign up for it must pay new-product prices for upgrades.

A telling 76% of respondents say the cost of Microsoft products will rise under Software Assurance while 17% say it will stay the same. Only 3% think the cost will fall (4% offered no response).

The survey also asked whether organisations use open source software, and whether their reliance on it was increasing as a result of Software Assurance. While 46% already use open source, 52% say their reliance is increasing as a result of the introduction of the licensing scheme. However, there appears some resistance to relying too much on open source, 46% saying they will not increase that reliance.

Computerworld emailed 2041 subscribers. The survey attracted 121 responses, a rate of about 6%.

A total of 68% of respondents represented organisations with fewer than 50 Microsoft licences, and 28% had more than 100 seats.

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