Witehira, Tindall behind Kiwi 3D monitor technology

Hamilton-based Deep Video Imaging is profiling its 3D image technology in Auckland today as a prelude to a major display launch in the US next week. The developers are Gabriel Engel, and Peter Witehira of Power Beat International. Warehouse MD Stephen Tindall is a shareholder.

Hamilton-based Deep Video Imaging is today profiling its 3D Deep Video Image technology in Auckland as a prelude to a major display launch in the US next week.

The company, which has been formed to market the technology, involves developers Gabriel Engel, and Peter Witehira of Power Beat International. Warehouse MD Stephen Tindall is a shareholder.

Its backers claim DVI lets people peer around objects on screen and see what lies behind and say it is "miles ahead" of rival systems that need glasses or headsets.

The technology works by adopting LCD technology to stream multiple or stereo video signals to a new screen format at different depths.

Customers then use touch screen technology to rotate three-dimensional images of products.

"You are not tricking your eyes into believing there are three dimensions, there is actual depth, with several layers of images," said co-inventor of the system, Gabriel Engel. He has spent the last three years in Hamilton developing the technology with Witehira.

Further support has come from Trade New Zealand, who will demonstrate the technology to industry leaders, including Daimler Chrysler, Borders and Continental Airlines, at a major Las Vegas trade show, Kioskcom, during April 17-20.

The technology will also be displayed at a Trade New Zealand Maori Enterprise Technology Seminar at Auckland's Stamford Plaza.

Mr Engel expects this will bring "significant results" for the company, adding some DVI technology has already been sold to Canadian phone giant Nortel.

In the US, interactive kiosks are now standard at airports, stores and car dealerships in the US, allowing shoppers to view models or catalogues through different angles and different optioning levels.

Mr Engel says Deep Video Imaging aims to license the technology to LCD manufacturers and form partnerships for technology to be used on computer screens.

"The flat panel display industry is now worth about $US12 billion per year, that's the market we are aiming towards.

"That's the ultimate goal, for this New Zealand invention from Power Beat to be offered on computer monitors around the world," he says.

Daryn Bean of Trade New Zealand confirmed TradeNZ support for the firm in attending shows in the US and Australia. He says the firm is a potential high technology exporter that could bring millions of dollars to New Zealand.

"Deep Video Imaging is a leader in technology. It is certainly very exciting, an exciting product. They have a clear strategy on how they hope to achieve some significant foreign exchange. They are going to the shows looking for immediate returns, confident of securing licensing agreements and export sales.

"It gives encouragement for (other) New Zealand companies who have good ideas," he says.

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