Stealing the show

Sun Microsystems claims 'Hollywood was inspired by everybody's favourite operating environment' -- meaning the brainwave for the new George Clooney movie Solaris came from Sun's Solaris.

At first, the new bartender, Cappy, seemed to be a sleepy man of few words. But now he is talking, and is he an easy fellow to agitate, too. "You have got to be free, not tied down," he told me.

Talk about trying to steal the show

Sun Microsystems claims "Hollywood was inspired by everybody's favourite operating environment" -- meaning the brainwave for the new George Clooney movie Solaris came from Sun's Solaris. This was spun out via an email invitation to a screening of the film last week at San Francisco's Metreon.

I can forgive the marketing stretch required to call Solaris "everybody's favourite" OS, which is certainly debatable. But I can hardly believe that McNealy & Co are trying to say they inspired the movie for which, by the by, the filmmaker publicly credits a 1961 novel by Stanislaw Lem and a 1972 film by Andrei Tarkovsky as its predecessors. Sun was not even an embryo in 1961.

But Sun is not the only one stealing the show lately. It seems that a group got its hands on the URL for what once was the Seattle XML user group. The URL points to a site not for an XML user group, but for an organisation that says it is fascinated with Linux. But the funniest part is that the covert group's URL somehow managed to infiltrate and get sent out as part of the December edition of Microsoft's PacWest Puget Sound local newsletter.

Doin' the samba

Perhaps Windows XP cannot dance, or at least not to the up-tempo numbers.

In setting up XP units on a network, one of my spies found that using XP with Linux Samba has caused printing problems. In short: the XP systems take a very, very long time to complete a print job. Just to get the printer splash screen up takes 3.5 minutes.

Bye-bye from Bank of America

According to a spy, Bank of America devised a technologically savvy -- but heartless -- tactic for laying off programmers: digital certificate revocation.

My spy says a month ago execs told the team that outsourcing IT was going so well they only needed two-thirds of the staff they had. The second round of layoffs came last week and a number of people found out when they received a note saying their digital certificates had been revoked, and then were shut out of email.

I, too, was greeted with a lock -- the front door to my place when I got home. Looking around, Amber was nowhere to be found. No note, nothing. But it was peaceful, being alone.

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