First six go for GoProcure

Six government agencies will move into using the GoProcure e-procurement system early this year, but Inland Revenue and the Ministry of Social Development, two of the major departments initially chosen for a pilot of the system, will not be among the early adopters.

Six government agencies will move into using the GoProcure e-procurement system early this year.

But Inland Revenue (IRD) and the Ministry of Social Development (MSD), two of the major departments initially chosen for a pilot of the system, will not be among the early adopters, say spokespeople for the departments.

An MSD spokesman says the department already has its own internal system, known as Kiwi, performing a number of the key functions of e-procurement, so wholesale early buy-in to GoProcure is not a significant need. “We are looking at partial implementation further down the track,” he says.

IRD and MSD, as well as being two of the largest government departments, were among five agencies named last year to trial the system. The major part of MSD in its Winz incarnation had been the key departmental testbed for development or requirements at the earliest stage of government's e-procurement project. The five-agency pilot plan was subsequently abandoned in favour of admitting any agency that wanted to take the plunge early.

Among other originally nominated triallists, Treasury also says it is not one of the first batch of full users.

"We still have it in our plans, but probably not this year," says a spokeswoman.

Fisheries Ministry deputy head Peter Murray declines to say whether the ministry is among the early takers. "If the SSC [State Services Commission] isn't commenting, then I won't," he says.

The other pioneer of the e-procurement development, the Fire Service, had not returned calls by deadline.

Four of the initial committed agencies will be “what we call ‘full-suite’ users”, says SSC e-government unit specialist Greg Nichols. They will take on all the major functionality of the system, such as sourcing, requisitioning and order-tracking.

One of these four will be using a “reduced functionality” version of GoProcure, Nichols says, since it is a small agency. He declines to name any of the initial users, however, since “governance documents” on their use of the system had not yet been signed when he spoke to Computerworld last week.

The remaining two agencies will be using GoProcure only as a “hub” for passing transactions, and will run the major procurement applications on their own systems.

There was some controversy last year when it was thought that government agencies might be forced to use GoProcure in its entirety. But in the event the compulsion extended only to “hub” use of the system, so that information on procurements can be shared easily among agencies.

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