InternetNZ calls for Net4U founder's head

InternetNZ is calling for the head of the founder of Hamilton ISP Net4U following allegations that Net4U was stealing another ISP's bandwidth.

InternetNZ is calling for the head of the founder of Hamilton ISP Net4U following allegations that Net4U was stealing another ISP's bandwidth.

Sahil Gupta, the 17-year-old who runs Net4U, has allegedly admitted leeching bandwidth off provider Attica Communications, a now-defunct subsidiary of Auckland-based telco CallPlus. Telecom is investigating the matter. Gupta is alleged to have boasted of his deed in a phone call to a former Net4U employee and a copy of that recording has been obtained by the New Zealand Herald. Two slightly different copies of the phone conversation have been posted to the New Zealand Network Operators Group (NZ NOG) mailing list.

InternetNZ executive director Peter Macaulay says the case draws attention to the need to have a code of practice or some form of self-regulation within the industry.

"I don't think people like that would adhere to a code of practice anyway; people who would steal other people's bandwidth and dishonestly on-sell stuff, and provide homes for spammers. They're not the sort of people anyone would want in the industry."

Macaulay believes existing legislation should be able to deal with such cases.

"We have laws here. All you have to do is find an invoice where he's charged someone for something which he's obtained from someone else fraudulently and you've got him."

Macaulay says he hopes to see such behaviour "off the air and out of business" as soon as possible.

As for the other employees of Net4U, Macaulay holds out an olive branch.

"We'd like to find out who else was involved and have a quiet word. I think some of the younger guys, the 14- to 17-year-olds, are redeemable. They need to realise what they're doing might seem clever at the time but is hugely damaging."

Macaulay also isn't impressed with the victim of the piece, Attica Communications, whose lack of system security enabled the bandwidth leeching to take place.

"I'm pretty horrified that an organisation allowed an open [proxy] to allow its bandwidth to be stolen for that amount of time."

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