NZ Linux users will hear from SCO

The SCO Group hasn't demanded licensing fees from NZ Linux users yet - but it will, the company says.

The SCO Group hasn't demanded licensing fees from NZ Linux users yet — but it will, the company says.

SCO will approach local Linux users to buy “SCO IP” licences once it has decided local licensing terms, says SCO Australia and New Zealand manager Kieran O’Shaughnessy.

SCO set “introductory” pricing for US licensees earlier this month. Server licences start at $US699 for a single CPU machine, up to $US4999 for an eight-way server plus $US749 per additional CPU. After October 15, a single-CPU server licence will cost $US1399.

The company claims recent Linux kernels include code lifted from Unix, and that Linux users need to purchase a licence from SCO for the “right to use SCO IP.” The claim is hotly disputed by many Linux users and vendors.

O’Shaughnessy told Computerworld that licence pricing for New Zealand was still to be determined. The company hasn’t decided whether introductory prices will be offered until October 15, he says.

Asked whether the company planned to approach local Linux users, O’Shaughnessy says it does. “In time, Linux commercial users will be contacted.”

SCO doesn’t yet have a list of companies using Linux, O’Shaughnessy says, but is aware who some users are through general industry knowledge.

O’Shaughnessy isn’t certain whether New Zealand Linux users can purchase a licence from the US, or whether they would need to wait for local pricing to be set, indicating that no potential licensees have contacted them.

“That hasn’t been an issue,” he says, although the company “will oblige” anybody who approaches SCO for a licence.

SCO doesn’t know how long it will take to set the local licence terms, O’Shaughnessy says.

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